Fort McKavett State Historic Site

Reenactors raise the US flag. The fort ruins at night. Soldier reenactors. Kids play games on the grounds.

7066 FM 864 
Fort McKavett, TX 76841
GPS: N30° 49' 28.2" W100° 6' 37.8"
325-396-2358
ft-mckavett@thc.texas.gov

 

Driving map to Fort McKavett.

Standing atop a windswept remote hill, the remains of a 150-year-old West Texas fort beckon curious visitors to the site that is now considered one of the best preserved and most intact examples of a Texas Indian Wars (1850–1875) military post. Take in the spectacular Hill Country vistas and experience the history of early West Texas life through the real stories of the infantrymen, Buffalo Soldiers, women, and children who lived at what Gen. William T. Sherman once described as "the prettiest post in Texas."

Restored structures include the officers’ quarters, barracks, hospital, school house, dead house, sink, and post headquarters. In addition, there are ruins of several buildings, most notably the commanding officer’s quarters, which burned in 1941, and the barracks along the north side of the parade ground, which once was the longest building west of the Mississippi River.

Upcoming Events

January 14

The Army’s Stomach: Foodways at Fort McKavett

Napoleon once said that “an army moves on its stomach.”  Without food, soldiers would have a hard time fighting the enemy, which is why the Army issued them basic rations consisting of meat, beans, and bread.  This, however, was not the sum of...

February 11

Accoutrements Workshop

For members of our reenacting group, Co. H, 8th US Infantry, this is an opportunity to work on your various accoutrement kits in preparation for upcoming events.  Expert Site Staff will be available to guide you through difficult portions or just...

March 11

POW Workshop

For participants in our “Imprisoned on the Frontier” event, this is a great opportunity to come to the fort and put the finishing touches on your impressions for the event.  Whether you need to sew a jacket together, complete accoutrements, or...

From the Blog