Posts About Stories of Texas History


By Andy Rhodes, Managing Editor The Medallion, Photos by Patrick Hughey

Texas caverns contain a natural sense of intrigue. How can these stunningly beautiful formations be hiding below scrubby patches of Hill Country landscape? How did someone first discover these otherworldly treasures? And how did they form in the first place?

Caverns played an important role in Texas...

The Medallion | Stories of Texas History, heritage travel

By Andy Rhodes, Managing Editor The Medallion; Photos by Patrick Hughey

“Man the halyards!”
“On the main—rise tacks and sheets! Mind the spinnaker!”
“Brace lively to the wind!”

These ancient nautical terms flutter through the gusty Gulf Coast breeze aboard the 142-year-old Elissa, one of the only ships of its kind restored to full sailing capacity. The formerly moored...

The Medallion | Stories of Texas History, heritage travel

By Danielle Brissette, Collections Manager, San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site

For most Texans, the end of the Texas Revolution is a relatively simple story. Even our own museum implies that once the Battle of San Jacinto was won, Texas’ victory was completely secured. The truth is, it just wasn’t that simple.

Two entire Mexican armies, over 2,500 soldados strong...

THC's Historic Sites, San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site | Stories of Texas History, heritage travel

NASA photo moon landing

By Andy Rhodes, Managing Editor The Medallion

“That’s one small step for man…”

Those six words immediately transport us to the iconic scene of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. Fifty years later, this momentous event still conjures awe and pride among Americans. Flying under the radar, however, is the nerve center that helped make it all possible: NASA’s Mission...

The Medallion | Stories of Texas History

By Andy Rhodes, Medallion Managing Editor 
Photos by Patrick Hughey

THC Commissioner Lilia Garcia is standing on a balcony overlooking the Rio Grande. As she recalls stories about the formerly fluid movement between Brownsville and Matamoros, she sighs deeply. It’s been many years since she crossed the river to visit friends in Mexico. Although...

The Medallion | Stories of Texas History, heritage travel

By Andy Rhodes, Managing Editor, The Medallion

In the early months of each year, the Rio Grande Valley’s population increases by about 100,000 people. Commonly known as Winter Texans, these semi-permanent residents flock from northern locales to Brownsville, McAllen, Mission, and other nearby cities for warmer temperatures and cultural opportunities.

Many...

The Medallion | Stories of Texas History, heritage travel

This article was originally featured in the November/December 1995 issue of The Medallion.

Not one, not two, but a record-breaking eight historical markers were dedicated recently in historic Thurber, a coal mining ghost town located 75 miles west of Fort Worth.

Founded in the 1880s by the Texas and Pacific Coal Company, Thurber at its height was the largest town...

The Medallion | Stories of Texas History

By Rich Koone, Education Director, National Museum of the Pacific War

During World War II, more than 2.5 million African American men registered for the draft. Of these, 1.2 million served in the military during the war. During their time in the military, they experienced discrimination, served in segregated units, and had segregated facilities. Despite this, they met the challenge and...

THC's Historic Sites, National Museum of the Pacific War | Stories of Texas History

By Bethanie DePalermo, San Felipe de Austin Staff

A striking pink granite bench with the simple inscription, “Austin’s Old 300,” sits under an oak tree at San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site. The bench itself provokes questions from visitors and creates an interpretive opportunity for staff and volunteers. Guests are surprised and intrigued to learn that descendants from...

THC's Historic Sites, San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site | Stories of Texas History